Alice Goffman: How we’re priming some kids for college — and others for prison

http://www.ted.com/playlists/250/talks

0:12

On the path that American children travel to adulthood, two institutions oversee the journey. The first is the one we hear a lot about: college. Some of you may remember the excitement that you felt when you first set off for college. Some of you may be in college right now and you’re feeling this excitement at this very moment.

0:34

College has some shortcomings. It’s expensive; it leaves young people in debt. But all in all, it’s a pretty good path. Young people emerge from college with pride and with great friends and with a lot of knowledge about the world. And perhaps most importantly, a better chance in the labor market than they had before they got there.

0:56

Today I want to talk about the second institution overseeing the journey from childhood to adulthood in the United States. And that institution is prison. Young people on this journey are meeting with probation officers instead of with teachers. They’re going to court dates instead of to class. Their junior year abroad is instead a trip to a state correctional facility. And they’re emerging from their 20s not with degrees in business and English, but with criminal records.

1:33

This institution is also costing us a lot, about 40,000 dollars a year to send a young person to prison in New Jersey. But here, taxpayers are footing the bill and what kids are getting is a cold prison cell and a permanent mark against them when they come home and apply for work.

1:53

There are more and more kids on this journey to adulthood than ever before in the United States and that’s because in the past 40 years, our incarceration rate has grown by 700 percent. I have one slide for this talk. Here it is. Here’s our incarceration rate, about 716 people per 100,000 in the population. Here’s the OECD countries.

2:29

What’s more, it’s poor kids that we’re sending to prison, too many drawn from African-American and Latino communities so that prison now stands firmly between the young people trying to make it and the fulfillment of the American Dream. The problem’s actually a bit worse than this ‘cause we’re not just sending poor kids to prison, we’re saddling poor kids with court fees, with probation and parole restrictions, with low-level warrants, we’re asking them to live in halfway houses and on house arrest, and we’re asking them to negotiate a police force that is entering poor communities of color, not for the purposes of promoting public safety, but to make arrest counts, to line city coffers.

3:17

This is the hidden underside to our historic experiment in punishment: young people worried that at any moment, they will be stopped, searched and seized. Not just in the streets, but in their homes, at school and at work.

3:33

I got interested in this other path to adulthood when I was myself a college student attending the University of Pennsylvania in the early 2000s. Penn sits within a historic African-American neighborhood. So you’ve got these two parallel journeys going on simultaneously: the kids attending this elite, private university, and the kids from the adjacent neighborhood, some of whom are making it to college, and many of whom are being shipped to prison.

4:03

In my sophomore year, I started tutoring a young woman who was in high school who lived about 10 minutes away from the university. Soon, her cousin came home from a juvenile detention center. He was 15, a freshman in high school. I began to get to know him and his friends and family, and I asked him what he thought about me writing about his life for my senior thesis in college. This senior thesis became a dissertation at Princeton and now a book.

4:32

By the end of my sophomore year, I moved into the neighborhood and I spent the next six years

4:37

trying to understand what young people were facing as they came of age. The first week I spent in this neighborhood, I saw two boys, five and seven years old, play this game of chase, where the older boy ran after the other boy. He played the cop. When the cop caught up to the younger boy, he pushed him down, handcuffed him with imaginary handcuffs, took a quarter out of the other child’s pocket, saying, “I’m seizing that.” He asked the child if he was carrying any drugs or if he had a warrant. Many times, I saw this game repeated, sometimes children would simply give up running, and stick their bodies flat against the ground with their hands above their heads, or flat up against a wall. Children would yell at each other, “I’m going to lock you up, I’m going to lock you up and you’re never coming home!” Once I saw a six-year-old child pull another child’s pants down and try to do a cavity search.

5:35

In the first 18 months that I lived in this neighborhood, I wrote down every time I saw any contact between police and people that were my neighbors. So in the first 18 months, I watched the police stop pedestrians or people in cars, search people, run people’s names, chase people through the streets, pull people in for questioning, or make an arrest every single day, with five exceptions. Fifty-two times, I watched the police break down doors, chase people through houses or make an arrest of someone in their home. Fourteen times in this first year and a half, I watched the police punch, choke, kick, stomp on or beat young men after they had caught them.

6:23

Bit by bit, I got to know two brothers, Chuck and Tim. Chuck was 18 when we met, a senior in high school. He was playing on the basketball team and making C’s and B’s. His younger brother, Tim, was 10. And Tim loved Chuck; he followed him around a lot, looked to Chuck to be a mentor. They lived with their mom and grandfather in a two-story row home with a front lawn and a back porch. Their mom was struggling with addiction all while the boys were growing up. She never really was able to hold down a job for very long. It was their grandfather’s pension that supported the family, not really enough to pay for food and clothes and school supplies for growing boys. The family was really struggling.

7:05

So when we met, Chuck was a senior in high school. He had just turned 18. That winter, a kid in the schoolyard called Chuck’s mom a crack whore. Chuck pushed the kid’s face into the snow and the school cops charged him with aggravated assault. The other kid was fine the next day, I think it was his pride that was injured more than anything.

7:28

But anyway, since Chuck was 18, this agg. assault case sent him to adult county jail on State Road in northeast Philadelphia, where he sat, unable to pay the bail — he couldn’t afford it — while the trial dates dragged on and on and on through almost his entire senior year. Finally, near the end of this season, the judge on this assault case threw out most of the charges and Chuck came home with only a few hundred dollars’ worth of court fees hanging over his head. Tim was pretty happy that day.

8:01

The next fall, Chuck tried to re-enroll as a senior, but the school secretary told him that he was then 19 and too old to be readmitted. Then the judge on his assault case issued him a warrant for his arrest because he couldn’t pay the 225 dollars in court fees that came due a few weeks after the case ended. Then he was a high school dropout living on the run.

8:23

Tim’s first arrest came later that year after he turned 11. Chuck had managed to get his warrant lifted and he was on a payment plan for the court fees and he was driving Tim to school in his girlfriend’s car. So a cop pulls them over, runs the car, and the car comes up as stolen in California. Chuck had no idea where in the history of this car it had been stolen. His girlfriend’s uncle bought it from a used car auction in northeast Philly. Chuck and Tim had never been outside of the tri-state, let alone to California. But anyway, the cops down at the precinct charged Chuck with receiving stolen property. And then a juvenile judge, a few days later, charged Tim, age 11, with accessory to receiving a stolen property and then he was placed on three years of probation. With this probation sentence hanging over his head,

9:18

Chuck sat his little brother down and began teaching him how to run from the police. They would sit side by side on their back porch looking out into the shared alleyway and Chuck would coach Tim how to spot undercover cars, how to negotiate a late-night police raid, how and where to hide.

9:38

I want you to imagine for a second what Chuck and Tim’s lives would be like if they were living in a neighborhood where kids were going to college, not prison. A neighborhood like the one I got to grow up in. Okay, you might say. But Chuck and Tim, kids like them, they’re committing crimes! Don’t they deserve to be in prison? Don’t they deserve to be living in fear of arrest? Well, my answer would be no. They don’t. And certainly not for the same things that other young people with more privilege are doing with impunity. If Chuck had gone to my high school, that schoolyard fight would have ended there, as a schoolyard fight. It never would have become an aggravated assault case. Not a single kid that I went to college with has a criminal record right now. Not a single one. But can you imagine how many might have if the police had stopped those kids and searched their pockets for drugs as they walked to class? Or had raided their frat parties in the middle of the night?

10:43

Okay, you might say. But doesn’t this high incarceration rate partly account for our really low crime rate? Crime is down. That’s a good thing. Totally, that is a good thing. Crime is down. It dropped precipitously in the ’90s and through the 2000s. But according to a committee of academics convened by the National Academy of Sciences last year, the relationship between our historically high incarceration rates and our low crime rate is pretty shaky. It turns out that the crime rate goes up and down irrespective of how many young people we send to prison.

11:20

We tend to think about justice in a pretty narrow way: good and bad, innocent and guilty. Injustice is about being wrongfully convicted. So if you’re convicted of something you did do, you should be punished for it. There are innocent and guilty people, there are victims and there are perpetrators. Maybe we could think a little bit more broadly than that.

11:43

Right now, we’re asking kids who live in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods, who have the least amount of family resources, who are attending the country’s worst schools, who are facing the toughest time in the labor market, who are living in neighborhoods where violence is an everyday problem, we’re asking these kids to walk the thinnest possible line — to basically never do anything wrong.

12:07

Why are we not providing support to young kids facing these challenges? Why are we offering only handcuffs, jail time and this fugitive existence? Can we imagine something better? Can we imagine a criminal justice system that prioritizes recovery, prevention, civic inclusion, rather than punishment? (Applause) A criminal justice system that acknowledges the legacy of exclusion that poor people of color in the U.S. have faced and that does not promote and perpetuate those exclusions. (Applause) And finally, a criminal justice system that believes in black young people, rather than treating black young people as the enemy to be rounded up. (Applause)

13:10

The good news is that we already are. A few years ago, Michelle Alexander wrote “The New Jim Crow,” which got Americans to see incarceration as a civil rights issue of historic proportions in a way they had not seen it before. President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder have come out very strongly on sentencing reform, on the need to address racial disparity in incarceration. We’re seeing states throw out Stop and Frisk as the civil rights violation that it is. We’re seeing cities and states decriminalize possession of marijuana. New York, New Jersey and California have been dropping their prison populations, closing prisons, while also seeing a big drop in crime. Texas has gotten into the game now, also closing prisons, investing in education. This curious coalition is building from the right and the left, made up of former prisoners and fiscal conservatives, of civil rights activists and libertarians, of young people taking to the streets to protest police violence against unarmed black teenagers, and older, wealthier people — some of you are here in the audience — pumping big money into decarceration initiatives In a deeply divided Congress, the work of reforming our criminal justice system is just about the only thing that the right and the left are coming together on.

14:36

I did not think I would see this political moment in my lifetime. I think many of the people who have been working tirelessly to write about the causes and consequences of our historically high incarceration rates did not think we would see this moment in our lifetime. The question for us now is, how much can we make of it? How much can we change?

14:58

I want to end with a call to young people, the young people attending college and the young people struggling to stay out of prison or to make it through prison and return home. It may seem like these paths to adulthood are worlds apart, but the young people participating in these two institutions conveying us to adulthood, they have one thing in common: Both can be leaders in the work of reforming our criminal justice system. Young people have always been leaders in the fight for equal rights, the fight for more people to be granted dignity and a fighting chance at freedom. The mission for the generation of young people coming of age in this, a sea-change moment, potentially, is to end mass incarceration and build a new criminal justice system, emphasis on the word justice.

15:51

Thanks.

15:52

(Applause)

0:12

En el camino de los jóvenes de EE.UU. a la edad adulta, dos instituciones supervisan el viaje. La primera, de la que escuchamos mucho es la universidad. Algunos recordarán la emoción que sintieron cuando partieron a la universidad. Algunos pueden estar en la universidad ahora y sienten esa emoción en este preciso momento.

0:34

La universidad tiene algunas deficiencias. Es costosa; deja a los jóvenes endeudados. Pero, en general, es un muy buen camino. Los jóvenes salen de la universidad con orgullo, con grandes amigos y con mucho conocimiento del mundo. Y quizá, lo más importante, con mejores oportunidades laborales que antes de llegar allí.

0:56

Hoy quiero hablar de la segunda institución que supervisa el viaje de los jóvenes a la edad adulta en EE. UU. Esa institución es la prisión. Los jóvenes en este viaje se reúnen con agentes de libertad condicional en vez de hacerlo con profesores. Van a citas en la corte en vez de a clase. En lugar de primer año en el extranjero van de viaje a un centro correccional. Están saliendo de sus 20 años no con títulos en negocios e inglés, sino con antecedentes penales.

1:33

Esta institución también nos cuesta mucho, unos USD 40 000 al año enviar a un joven a prisión en Nueva Jersey. Pero aquí, los contribuyentes pagan la factura y los chicos reciben una celda fría y una marca permanente en su contra cuando llegan a casa y buscan empleo.

1:53

Cada vez hay más jóvenes en este viaje a la edad adulta que en toda la historia de EE.UU. porque en los últimos 40 años la tasa de encarcelamiento creció un 700 %. Tengo una diapositiva para esta charla. Es esta. Aquí está nuestra tasa de encarcelamiento, unas 716 personas por cada 100 000 habitantes de la población. Estos son países de la OECD.

2:29

Es más, estamos enviando a la cárcel a los jóvenes pobres, muchos de las comunidades afro y latina, así que la prisión se interpone entre los jóvenes y el “sueño americano”. El problema en realidad es un poco peor que esto porque no solo enviamos a los jóvenes pobres a la prisión, sino que endeudamos a jóvenes pobres con tasas judiciales, con restricciones de libertad condicional, con bajo nivel de garantías. Les pedimos que vivan en centros de reinserción y en arresto domiciliario, y les pedimos que negocien con una fuerza policial que encarcela comunidades pobres y de color no para promover la seguridad pública, sino para el recuento de arrestos de las arcas municipales.

3:17

Es la parte oculta de nuestro experimento histórico de castigo: los jóvenes temen en cualquier momento ser detenidos, requisados y arrestados. No solo en las calles, sino en sus hogares, en la escuela y en el trabajo.

3:33

Me interesé en este otro camino a la edad adulta cuando era estudiante en la Universidad de Pennsylvania en la década de 2000. Penn se encuentra en un histórico barrio afro de EE.UU. Estos dos viajes paralelos ocurren al mismo tiempo: jóvenes que asisten a esta universidad privada, de élite, y jóvenes del barrio adyacente, algunos que van a la universidad, y muchos a los que se les envía a la cárcel.

4:03

En mi segundo año, empecé como tutora de una joven de secundaria que vivía a unos 10 minutos de la universidad. Pronto, su primo llegó de un centro de detención juvenil. Tenía 15 años, era estudiante de 1º de secundaria. Empecé a conocerlo y a sus amigos y familiares, y le pregunté qué pensaba de mí que escribía sobre su vida para mi tesis de grado en la universidad. Esta tesis de grado se convirtió en una tesis de Princeton y ahora en un libro.

4:32

Al final de mi segundo año, me mudé al barrio y pasé los siguientes 6 años intentando entender a lo que enfrentaban los jóvenes en su mayoría de edad. La primera semana que pasé en este barrio, vi a dos niños, de 5 y 7 años, jugar a la persecución, donde el mayor perseguía al menor. Jugaban a policías. Cuando el policía capturaba al menor, lo tiraba al suelo, le ponía esposas imaginarias, tomaba 25 centavos del bolsillo del otro niño, y decía: “Me quedo con esto”. Le preguntó al niño si portaba alguna droga o si tenía una orden judicial. Muchas veces vi repetir este juego, a veces los niños simplemente dejaban de correr, y ponían sus cuerpos contra el suelo con sus manos sobre la cabeza, o hacia arriba contra la pared. Los niños se gritaban: “Voy a encerrarte, voy a encerrarte y ¡nunca volverás a casa!” Una vez vi a un niño de 6 años tirar de los pantalones de otro tratando de hacer una búsqueda de cavidad.

5:35

En los primeros 18 meses que viví en ese barrio, anoté cada vez que veía cualquier contacto entre la policía y las personas que eran mis vecinos. Así, en los primeros 18 meses, vi a la policía detener peatones o personas en los autos, buscar personas, preguntar nombres, perseguir personas por las calles, sacar personas para interrogarlas, o hacer un arresto diariamente, con 5 excepciones. 52 veces vi a la policía romper puertas, perseguir personas en casas o detener a alguien en su casa. 14 veces en el primer año y medio vi a la policía pegar, golpear, asfixiar, patear o pisar a jóvenes tras haberlos capturado.

6:23

Poco a poco, llegué a conocer a dos hermanos, Chuck y Tim. Chuck tenía 18 años cuando nos conocimos, estudiaba el último año de secundaria. Jugaba en el equipo de baloncesto y tenía Ces y Bes. Su hermano, Tim, tenía 10 años. Tim amaba a Chuck, lo seguía mucho, veía a Chuck como un tutor. Vivían con su madre y abuelo en una casa de 2 pisos con un jardín delantero y un porche trasero. Su madre luchaba contra la adicción mientras los muchachos crecían. Ella nunca podía mantener un trabajo por mucho tiempo. Vivían con la pensión del abuelo, que no alcanzaba para pagar ropa, alimentos y útiles escolares para los niños. La familia estaba realmente luchando.

7:05

Cuando nos conocimos, Chuck estudiaba el último año de la secundaria. Acababa de cumplir 18 años. Ese invierno, un niño en el patio de la escuela tildó a la madre de Chuck de puta drogadicta. Chuck empujó la cara del niño a la nieve y los policías escolares lo acusaron de asalto agravado. El otro chico estaba bien al día siguiente, creo que lesionó su orgullo más que nada.

7:28

De todos modos, como Chuck tenía 18 años, este caso lo envió a la cárcel de adultos del condado en la carretera estatal del noreste de Filadelfia, donde se quedó, por no poder pagar la fianza –no podía permitírselo– y mientras las fechas de los juicios se extendieron casi todo su último año. Finalmente, casi al final de esa temporada, el juez del caso desestimó la mayor parte de los cargos y Chuck volvió a casa con cientos de dólares en tasas judiciales sobre su cabeza. Tim estaba muy feliz ese día.

8:01

El siguiente otoño, Chuck trató de volver a su último año, pero la secretaria de la escuela le dijo que con 19 años era demasiado mayor para ser readmitido. Luego el juez del caso emitió una orden de arresto porque él no podía pagar los USD 225 en tasas judiciales que vinieron un par de semanas después de terminado el caso. Luego fue un desertor escolar que vivía en la carretera.

8:23

La primera detención de Tim llegó más tarde ese año después de cumplir los 11. Chuck había conseguido levantar su orden judicial y entró en un plan de pago de las tasas judiciales y llevaba a Tim a la escuela en el auto de su novia. Un policía los sigue, detiene el auto, y el auto aparece como robado en California. Chuck no sabía que el auto había sido robado. El tío de su novia lo compró en una subasta de autos usados en el noreste de Filadelfia. Chuck y Tim nunca habían estado fuera de la tri-estatal, y mucho menos en California. Pero, de todos modos, en la comisaría acusaron a Chuck de recibir propiedad robada. Y un juez de menores, unos días más tarde, culpó a Tim, de 11 años, por recibir propiedad robada y le dio 3 años de libertad condicional. Con esta sentencia de libertad condicional sobre su cabeza,

9:18

Chuck se sentó con su hermanito y le enseñó a huir de la policía. Se sentaban lado a lado en su porche trasero mirando hacia el callejón compartido y Chuck le enseñaba a Tim a detectar vehículos encubiertos, cómo negociar una redada policial nocturna, cómo y dónde esconderse.

9:38

Quiero que imaginen por un segundo cómo serían las vidas de Chuck y Tim si viviesen en un barrio en el que los chicos fuesen a la universidad, y no a la cárcel. Un barrio como en el que yo tengo que crecer. Bueno, podrán decir, pero los niños como Chuck y Tim, ¡están cometiendo delitos! ¿No se merecen estar en la cárcel? ¿No se merecen vivir con el temor al arresto? Bueno, mi respuesta sería no. No lo merecen. Y desde luego no por las mismas cosas que los otros jóvenes con más privilegios hacen con impunidad. Si Chuck hubiese ido a mi secundaria, esa pelea escolar habría terminado allí, como una pelea escolar. Nunca se habría convertido en un caso de asalto agravado. Ni un solo chico con el que fui a la universidad tiene antecedentes penales ahora. Ni uno solo. Pero ¿imaginan cuántos los tendrían si la policía los hubiese detenido buscado droga en sus bolsillos de camino a clases? ¿O si hubiese allanado sus fiestas en medio de la noche?

10:43

Bueno, podrán decir, pero, ¿no es esa alta tasa de encarcelamiento en parte responsable del muy bajo índice de criminalidad? El crimen es bajo. Eso es bueno. Totalmente, es algo bueno. El crimen es bajo. Cayó precipitadamente en los años 90 y en la década de 2000. Pero de acuerdo con un comité de académicos convocado por la Academia Nacional de Ciencias el año pasado, la relación entre nuestros índices de encarcelamiento históricamente altos y nuestra baja tasa de criminalidad es bastante inestable. La tasa de criminalidad sube y baja independientemente de cuántos jóvenes enviemos a la cárcel.

11:20

Solemos pensar la justicia de manera muy estrecha: buenos y malos, inocentes y culpables. Injusticia es ser condenado injustamente. Si uno es condenado por algo que hizo, debe ser castigado por ello. Hay personas inocentes y culpables, hay víctimas y victimarios. Quizá podríamos pensar de manera un poco más amplia que eso.

11:43

Ahora les estamos pidiendo a chicos que viven en los barrios más desfavorecidos, en familias de escasos recursos, que van a las peores escuelas del país, y enfrentan lo más difícil del mercado laboral, que viven en barrios en los que la violencia es un problema cotidiano, les pedimos a estos chicos que caminen por la cuerda más delgada posible… que básicamente no hagan nada mal.

12:07

¿Por qué no damos apoyo a los jóvenes que enfrentan estos desafíos? ¿Por qué les ofrecemos solamente esposas, cárcel y una existencia fugitiva? ¿Podemos imaginar algo mejor? ¿Podemos imaginar un sistema de justicia penal que priorice la recuperación, la prevención, la inclusión cívica, en lugar del castigo? (Aplausos) Un sistema de justicia penal que reconozca el legado de exclusión que los pobres de color han enfrentado en EE.UU. y que no fomente y perpetúe esas exclusiones. (Aplausos) Y, por último, un sistema de justicia penal que crea en los jóvenes negros, en vez de tratarlos como el enemigo de la redada. (Aplausos)

13:10

La buena noticia es que ya lo hacemos. Hace unos años, Michelle Alexander escribió “El nuevo Jim Crow”, que hizo ver a EE.UU. el encarcelamiento como un asunto de derechos civiles de proporciones históricas como nunca antes se había visto. El presidente Obama y el fiscal general Eric Holder abordaron con mucha fuerza la reforma de sentencia, sobre la necesidad de atajar la disparidad racial en la cárcel. Vemos estados que denominan el “parar y cachear” como la violación de derechos civiles que es. Vemos ciudades y estados que despenalizan la posesión de marihuana. Nueva York, Nueva Jersey y California han disminuido sus poblaciones penitenciarias, cierran cárceles, y al mismo tiempo ven un gran descenso del crimen. Texas ahora entró en el juego, también cierra prisiones, invierte en educación. Esta curiosa coalición construida desde la derecha y la izquierda, conformada por exprisioneros y fiscales conservadores, por activistas de derechos civiles y libertarios, por jóvenes que toman las calles para protestar contra la violencia policial contra adolescentes negros desarmados, y personas más ricas de edad avanzada –algunos están presentes en el público– pone grandes sumas de dinero en iniciativas de reducción de cárceles. En un Congreso profundamente dividido, el trabajo de la reforma del sistema de justicia penal es casi lo único en que la derecha y la izquierda avanzan juntas.

14:36

No pensé que iba a ver este momento político en mi vida. Creo que muchas de las personas que han estado trabajando sin descanso para escribir las causas y consecuencias de nuestras altas tasas de encarcelamiento históricas no pensaron que veríamos este momento en nuestra vida. La pregunta para nosotros ahora es, ¿cuánto podemos hacer con ella? ¿Cuánto puede cambiar?

14:58

Quiero terminar con una llamada a los jóvenes, a los jóvenes que asisten a la universidad y a los jóvenes que luchan por mantenerse fuera de la cárcel o por ir a la cárcel y volver a casa. Puede parecer que estos caminos a la adultez son mundos aparte, pero los jóvenes que participan en estas dos instituciones que nos transportan a la edad adulta, tienen algo en común: Ambos pueden ser líderes de la reforma de nuestro sistema de justicia penal. Los jóvenes siempre han sido líderes en la lucha por la igualdad de derechos, en la lucha para que más personas tengan dignidad y es una oportunidad de luchar por la libertad. La misión para la generación joven en este momento de cambio radical, potencialmente, es acabar con la encarcelación en masa y construir un nuevo sistema de justicia penal, con énfasis en la palabra justicia.

15:51

Gracias.

Alice Goffman’s fieldwork in a struggling Philadelphia neighborhood sheds harsh light on a justice system that creates suspects rather than citizens.

Anúncios

Deixe um comentário

Preencha os seus dados abaixo ou clique em um ícone para log in:

Logotipo do WordPress.com

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta WordPress.com. Sair / Alterar )

Imagem do Twitter

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Twitter. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Facebook

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Facebook. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Google+

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Google+. Sair / Alterar )

Conectando a %s